Tu-Na Travels and Quilts: Day Seven in Paris and Finishing The Leftovers

Tu-Na Travels and Quilts: Day Seven in Paris and Finishing The Leftovers

Today we explored the Rodin Museum and saw beautiful sculptures and a few paintings by some great masters.

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Young Woman in a Flowered Hat

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The Kiss

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It was a lovely day for a walk outside in the Rodin Sculpture Garden where the gardens were in full bloom with flowers larger than I have ever seen.

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Yes, there were sculptures in the garden.

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Is this the pose you take when contemplating your next quilt project?

This sculpture is called The Thinker.

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Or maybe it’s the pose you take when you just discover a mistake.

On our walk back from dinner we spied this itty bitty car. I’ve never seen one so small. Have you?

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I am 5 feet 4 inches and tower over this car.

Some days we would stop at a pastry shop and pick up dessert. Here’s what we shared tonight.

 What I learned today…Mardi, April 22, 2014

  1. The lilacs in full bloom in Paris smell better and look more brilliant than at home.tunaquilts 13b
  2. Chocolate ice cream tastes better in an outdoor café in the Rodin Sculpture Garden in Paris than at home.tunaquilts 15a
  3. I can start a conversation with anyone whether we speak the same language or not. This is not surprising to my husband. I sat down on a bench beside a French woman in the Rodin Museum. We talked with signs and expressions and a few words. She conveyed to me that her feet hurt and I acknowledged and I tried to express that the art work of Maplethorpe (special exhibit at the Rodin Museum that our husband’s were looking at) was not interesting to me but she liked it. We understood each other perfectly at least that is what I think. I also started a conversation with a woman from Britain and later her husband joined us and we visited for almost a half an hour. We will be leaving Paris soon and heading to London. This lady told us to plan to come back to England again and see more of the country side. She said, “Going only to London to get a flavor of England is like us going to New York to get a flavor of the United States.” I can see her point. It was interesting to talk with them and fun to listen to them talk. They probably thought the same.

Poodle Block Tips:

Now onto Part Sept (7) Prepping the Last of the Extra Pieces (You will find links to Parts 1-6 at the very end of this post.) We are nearing the finish line.

I like to refer to these pieces as the leftovers because by now you’ve used most of your pile of extra pieces so we need to something about those that are left over. In fact, after this part, all your extra pieces should be gone.

You will need the following pieces:

  • Two 1.25″ x 2.75″ background rectangles
  • One l.25″ x 2.75″ body rectangle
  • One 1.25″ x 2″ body rectangle
  • One 1.25″ body square
  • One 1.25″ x 4.25″ body rectangle
  • Eye
  • Ear

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So let’s lay them out and stitch them according to Sally’s tutorial for her Right Facing poodle tutorial on The Objects of Design or my picture below.

  • Place the 1.25″ body square right sides together on the bottom of the 1.25″ x 2.75″ background piece. Flip that corner in the direction shown below. See Part (3) Prepping Those Furry Pieces if you need a refresher on how to do that.  Trim this piece to 1.25″ x 2.75″. This part will go up by the tail.
  • Place the 1.25″ x 4.25″ body rectangle on the right side of the ear. Sew together using a 1/4″ seam and press towards the body rectangle. Trim to 3.5″ x 4.25″.
  • Place the eye piece right sides together on the top of the 1.25″ x 2″ body rectangle and stitch a 1/4″ seam as shown below. Press towards the dark side. Trim to 1.25″ x 2.75″.
  • Place the 1.25″ x 2.75″ background right sides together on the 1.25″ x 2.75″ body rectangle. Stitch 1/4″ seam down the long side. (The arrow in the picture indicates putting them right sides together.) Press towards the dark side. Trim to 2″ x 2.75″. This part becomes the front leg.
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I finally found my Sewline pencil for marking lines. It was right where I store it, in the tool caddy. Now, why didn’t I look for it there before?

Now stand back and admire your hard work. All the pieces are prepped and we’ll be ready to assemble this sweet poodle block next time.

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Coming soon: Part Huit (8) Some Assembly Required. This will complete the poodle block.

Announcement:  More Poodles Have Been Sighted Running Around My House!!

My knight in shining armor, ok. maybe not the knight below, but my husband

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We saw much armor today as we also went to some military museums and saw where Napoleon was buried.

came in from the mail box a couple of days ago saying, “Woof, woof. Woof, woof” I knew that meant there must be poodle mail for me.

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The boys have arrived from Canada with a sweet note from Velda, Granny Can Quilt.

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Velda’s note says this one is Odie. He is a star in her heart. Look at that gorgeous star fabric.

She made him to commemorate her real poodle named Odie who only roamed around her house for two years but will remain in her heart forever.

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Here’s Odie showing his ability to fit in with his human family by sitting all proper on the couch. This picture was taken by Granny Can Quilt and used with permission.

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Here’s Tigg. He’s modeled after one of Velda’s poodles at home.

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Tigg is a handsome fella (just look at that pose). He is the senior poodle in Velda’s house. This picture was taken by Granny Can Quilt and used with permission.

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The guys came bearing gifts! Velda sent some 1.5″ strips for me to cut into squares for my postage stamp and a pink square for the cornerstone of this quilt.

Thanks, Velda!! These poodles are gorgeous and I will definitely make use of the strips. Your hard work is much appreciated!

What I Learned Today:

  1. It’s nice to have technology that allows me to find quilting friends all over the world.
  2. My husband caught me sneaking a taste of his favorite mint ice cream in the pic above. I had not seen that one before.

Question: Chocolate or Mint or____? I’ve always loved chocolate but strawberry is a favorite, too, when I splurge.

If you enjoyed this post and would like to read more about my journey or follow me, please visit my blog, Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats. Thank you for visiting Bee Inspired.

Au Revoir

Karen, Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats

Here are the previous poodle posts just in case you need to catch up to figure out what is going on this month at Bee Inspired. We’ve all gone on vacation—don’t we wish—to Paris. Well, maybe at least in our minds and imaginations.

Tu-Na Quilts: All Aboard. Fasten Your Seatbelts. We’re Taking Off for… You will find the pattern link for the poodle block in this post as well as why I chose this block.

Tu-Na Travels: Day One in Paris which includes Part un (1): Pattern and Fabric Selection

Tu-Na Travels: Day Two in Paris and Poodle Block Cutting Tips which includes Part deux (2): Cutting and Anatomy Labeling

Tu-Na Travels: Day Three in Paris and Prepping Those Furry Pieces which includes Part trois (3): Prepping the Furry Accent Pieces (Foot poofs, Tail, and Ear) 

Tu-Na Travels: Day Four in Paris and Prepping the Poodle Body Parts which includes Part quatre (4) Prepping the Poodle Body Parts.

Tu-Na Travels: Day Five in Paris and Prepping the Background Pieces which includes Part Cinq (5) Prepping the Background Pieces.

Tu-Na Travels and Quilts: Day Six in Paris and Building the Frame Around Our Pampered Pooch which includes Part Six (6) Building the Frame Around Our Pampered Pooch.

Tu-Na Travels and Quilts: Day Six in Paris and Building the Frame Around Our Pampered Pooch

Tu-Na Travels and Quilts: Day Six in Paris and Building the Frame Around Our Pampered Pooch

Today we returned on foot to the Louvre to see many paintings by some very well-known masters:

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Vermeer

 

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Rembrandt

 

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Renoir

 

We saw lots of other paintings including some with lots of hands

 

 

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and some with really pretty faces.

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We left the Louvre and began our walk to the Arc de Triomphe. Along the way we saw a very interesting concept which we think the cities where we live should use—at least we haven’t seen it yet.

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Again, maybe it doesn’t take much to impress us, but we were very intrigued with this sidewalk vacuum. Do you have sidewalk vacuums where you live?

 

Finally, we reached the Arc.

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One more trip past the Eiffel Tower made the end of a beautiful day.

 

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What I learned today…Lundi, April 21, 2014

  1. Crème Brulee and coffee in an outdoor café makes a delicious Parisian lunch.

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  2. 4.80€ for a small cup of coffee without refills is a bit expensive, so is a bottle of water at 3.50€. No water is served unless you pay for it.
  3. Paprika Pringles are very tasty. I sure hope I can start buying them at home.
  4. There are 284 steps in the circular staircase leading up to the top of the Arc de Triomphe. Going down was much easier.

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    Looking down from the top.

  5. The Arc de Triomphe sits in the center of an intersection of 12 major streets coming together with a round-about (circle). Luckily for me, I wasn’t driving or I’d probably still be there (I am a timid driver).

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    A view from on top of the Arc de Triomphe. Note the tree lined streets coming towards the Arc and the Eiffel Tower in the background.

  6. Went back to the Gloria restaurant and verified that it is the best Italian food we’ve tasted.

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  7. The app on my husband’s phone read 27,863 steps today or 10.99 miles. We both had dessert this evening. We earned it!tunaquilts 26a

Poodle Block Tips:

Now onto Part Six (6) Building the Frame Around Our Pampered Pooch (You will find links to Parts 1-5 at the very end of this post.)

Handy Hint: I highly recommend laying out these frame parts on an extra cutting mat, corner of your sewing table, large cookie sheet or tray, piece of cardboard, pool table, large design board or whatever flat space you can find where you can let them stay while you finish the block or easily move them all contained without messing them up. Just in case you get distracted, you can easily come back and pick right up where you left off.

Use Sally’s Tutorial for the Right facing poodle found on her blog The Objects of Design or my picture below to lay the following pieces in the correct orientation. Moving clockwise, lay them in the following order: 

  • Top left corner (refer to number 1 in pic below to help you find it)
  • Top right corner (2)
  • Right side under muzzle (3)
  • Bottom middle (4)
  • Bottom left corner (5)
  • Lower left middle (6)
  • Behind rear under tail (7)
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The names on the labels were so small so I put numbers here to help you identify the piece.

 

You will also need the following Extra pieces:  three 1.25″ square body pieces, one 2″ body square, and one 1.25″ x 2″ body piece. Follow Sally’s tutorial or my picture below, lay the pieces right side together:

  • Top right corner (piece 2 in picture below) needs a 1.25″ square body piece on the left bottom corner.
  • Right side under muzzle (piece 3 in picture below) needs a 1.25″ square body piece on the top left corner.
  • Lower left middle (piece 6 in picture below) needs the 1.25″ x 2″ body piece sewn to the right side (shortest side). Might as well go sew this one with right sides together 1/4″ seam, press to the dark.
  • Behind rear under tail  (piece 7 in picture below) needs the 2 ” body square placed in the upper right corner AND a 1.25″ body square in the lower right corner.
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I’ve drawn in the sewing lines. We won’t be using all the pieces for this part.

 

Now flip those corners (draw a diagonal line from corner to corner, stitch, trim to 1/4″, press). (Refer to Part 3 Prepping those Furry Accent Pieces if you need to see how that is done).

Did I make an extra bonus half-square triangle block using the 2″ piece on the Behind rear under tail piece? It’s not required for this block but it might be useful for a future project. I sure did! Did you?

To ensure the finished block will be close to the correct size, I like to square each piece now to the following sizes:

  • Top right corner squares to 2.75″
  • Right side under muzzle squares to 3.5″ x 9.5″
  • Lower left middle squares to  3.5″ x 2″
  • Behind rear under tail squares to 3.5″ x 5″

Now stand back and look at your hard work.

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Coming soon as we near the finish line: Part Sept (7) Prepping the Last of the Extra Pieces

Finally, we break through the ribbon and finish with Part Huit (8) Some Assembly Required

What I Learned Today:

  1. I still can’t find paprika Pringles around here (in North Dakota). I’ll have to check in Arizona this winter.
  2. June is going fast.

Question: Have you run in a race? What does it feel as you near the finish line? No racing for me since I’ve been out of school but my 8 year old grandson ran in one in Duluth. I can’t wait to hear about it when we see him.

Au Revoir

Karen, Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats

If you enjoyed this post and would like to read more about my journey or follow me, please visit my blog, Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats. Thank you for visiting Bee Inspired.

Here are the previous poodle posts just in case you need to catch up to figure out what is going on this month at Bee Inspired. We’ve all gone on vacation—don’t we wish—to Paris. Well, maybe at least in our minds and imaginations.

Tu-Na Quilts: All Aboard. Fasten Your Seatbelts. We’re Taking Off for… You will find the pattern link for the poodle block in this post as well as why I chose this block.

Tu-Na Travels: Day One in Paris which includes Part un (1): Pattern and Fabric Selection

Tu-Na Travels: Day Two in Paris and Poodle Block Cutting Tips which includes Part deux (2): Cutting and Anatomy Labeling

Tu-Na Travels: Day Three in Paris and Prepping Those Furry Pieces which includes Part trois (3): Prepping the Furry Accent Pieces (Foot poofs, Tail, and Ear) 

Tu-Na Travels: Day Four in Paris and Prepping the Poodle Body Parts which includes Part quatre (4) Prepping the Poodle Body Parts.

Tu-Na Travels: Day Five in Paris and Prepping the Background Pieces which includes Part Cinq (5) Prepping the Background Pieces.

Tu-Na Travels: Day Five in Paris and Prepping the Background Pieces

Tu-Na Travels: Day Five in Paris and Prepping the Background Pieces

Today was the day of selfies. As I was looking at our vacation photos, I discovered more selfies taken this day than all the other days in Paris combined. Probably because we had to stand in line at the Palace of Versailles and the lines moved slowly.

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The lines were long and we had to wait almost three hours to enter. Once inside the gate, we had to wait again to enter the Palace and once we were finished looking inside, we had to wait in yet another line outside to enter the palace grounds.

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Here we are with King Louis XIV

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and Marie Antoinette.

I could show you about 50 more of us, but since this is a quilting blog, I want to keep it at least a little bit about quilting. I wonder if you’d like to make a quilt for this bed?

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Or maybe this one pictured below? The sign said “Queen’s Room.” So does that mean the one above is the King’s room? I don’t remember.

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This is just a very small part of the grounds which included many ponds and fountains.

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Here’s one of them.

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After a long train ride back to our apartment, we dined on this light supper which included some fruit, a sandwich, some good and expensive cheese, paprika Pringles and, of course, some French wine.

What I learned today….dimanche, April 20, 2014

  1. Do not go to the Palace of Versailles on an Easter Sunday. About a million other people decided to do the same. Lines were long and moved very slowly.
  2. We did a lot of standing today: standing still, standing in line, standing around, standing and smiling—we never knew whose photograph we might end up on.
  3. We did not see it all (Palace and grounds). We will have to come back.
  4. French Kings sure knew how to live in luxury. The Palace and grounds were very beautiful.

Poodle Block Tips:

Part cinq (5): Prepping the Background Pieces

We will work with only five pieces for this part. But we are getting one step closer to being done. Aren’t you so excited? Don’t you just love the way I’m prolonging this block? Especially, if you are sewing along. No, really, I thought that by breaking it into manageable steps, it is doable for even the beginner sewer (or is it sewist?).

Sally refers to these pieces as “white” in her right facing poodle tutorial on The Objects of Design blog. Adding to the confusion for you, I will refer to them as background (just because it is less confusing for me and well, maybe for you, too).

Find the Above Back and Under Belly background pieces and two 1.25″ square body extra pieces plus one 2.75″ square body piece. (Note: This is one of the corrections from Sally’s tutorial as she asks for a 2″ piece but you will need to use the 2.75″.)

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Now place one 1.25″ body square on the bottom left corner of the Above Back piece as pictured below.

 

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Place a 1.25″ body square on the top right corner and a 2.75″ body square on the left side of the Under Belly piece as pictured below. Now flip those corners. (Draw a diagonal line, sew, trim seam to 1/4″ and press.) Refer to Part 3-Prepping the Furry Accents for a step by step explanation of how to do this if needed. The next four pictures will show you how to make a bonus block with half-square triangles.

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I draw a line diagonally from corner to corner, and because I also don’t want to waste fabric, I draw another line 1/2″ towards the outside corner on these bigger pieces. I sew close to these lines, not on them but a needles width to the right of the line towards the corner. (This picture has been edited to show the correct corner to flip on that large square).

 

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Then I cut between the seams (each will have a 1/4″ seam allowance).

 

 

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After pressing the seams, I square my bonus block. This one will square to 2″. I love doing this.

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And there’s my bonus block for another project! Did you make one too?

You may ask, “Why didn’t you do that on all the other corners we flipped?” Since I am a visual learner and you may be to, I thought I’d show you what happens. There is a point when it just doesn’t pay. And those small squares would only give you a block that squares to 1/2″ unfinished. Now I don’t have any sewing projects needing that small of blocks because there would be nothing left after sewing it as it would all go into the seam allowance.

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There’s that little half -inch square. Cute but worthless.

After pressing all your seams, square the Above Back piece to 3.5″ x 5″ and the Under Belly piece to 2.75″ x 6.5″. Now stand back and admire your hard work.

 

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This picture has been edited to show the correct larger flipped corner. If your piece doesn’t look like this one with these corners flipped this way, you’ll be needing to recut the pieces and reflip those corners. It took me a bit to discover this mistake.

 

That’s it for part 5. Coming soon: Part six (6) Building the Frame Around our Pampered Pooch. It’s coming along nicely.

Here are the previous poodle posts just in case you need to catch up to figure out what is going on this month at Bee Inspired. We’ve all gone on vacation—don’t we wish—to Paris. Well, maybe at least in our minds and imaginations.

Tu-Na Quilts: All Aboard. Fasten Your Seatbelts. We’re Taking Off for… You will find the pattern link for the poodle block in this post as well as why I chose this block.

Tu-Na Travels: Day One in Paris which includes Part un (1): Pattern and Fabric Selection

Tu-Na Travels: Day Two in Paris and Poodle Block Cutting Tips which includes Part deux (2): Cutting and Anatomy Labeling

Tu-Na Travels: Day Three in Paris and Prepping Those Furry Pieces which includes Part trois (3): Prepping the Furry Accent Pieces (Foot poofs, Tail, and Ear) 

Tu-Na Travels: Day Four in Paris and Prepping the Poodle Body Parts which includes Part quatre (4) Prepping the Poodle Body Parts.

Coming soon: Part six (6) Building the Frame Around our Pampered Pooch

What I Learned Today:

  1. Pictures do not do justice to the beauty found in and around Paris.
  2. Some things just have to be experienced.
  3. Don’t waste my time making bonus half-square triangle blocks on every corner I flip. Only do the ones that would give me a respectable and useable finished piece.

Question: Have you visited a unique place where people live or lived? Where?

If you enjoyed this post and would like to read more about my journey or follow me, please visit my blog Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats. Thank you for visiting Bee Inspired.

Au Revoir

Karen, Tu-Na Quilts, Travels, and Eats

 

Tu-Na Quilts: All Aboard. Fasten Your Seatbelts. We’re Taking Off for…

Paris! Oui, oui, s’il vous plaît. Mes chers amis quilty, un voyage au beau Paris serait tellement merveilleux.*

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I apologize for the blurriness. I was in a hurry as we were leaving to head north and remembered to grab a couple of pics. My husband took these pics and we had them made into prints. They are displayed in our guest room.

 

It was always a dream of mine to visit Paris. Three years ago, it became a reality. I thought you might like to go too.

I have a number of fun and funny posts planned for this month so I hope you’ll check back here often so you won’t be left behind.

My inspiration for my quilt block comes from several sources. I’ll share one now and another on another post. Early this winter my mom and I were shopping for fabric (well, we were just looking) and then I spied this.

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It would be perfect for a quilt in our guest room in Arizona. So I bought all that they had which was about 2 1/2 yards because…why not? I think it would be perfect for the sashing.

“What kind of quilt are you going to make?” asked my husband (who is also lovingly refered to as Tu-Na Helper).

Since Velda had already taken my bird idea, I had to come up with another plan. So I looked closer at that fabric and spied this cute little poodle.

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Do you see that cute little poodle? The background is bright white although it looks bluish here.

 

I don’t have a dog but if I ever did it just might be a poodle, a French Poodle. A French poodle block would be perfect to go with my Paris themed guest room.

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I found this wonderful addition to our guest room at a thrift shop. In fact, the headboard, each of the two identical lamps, side tables, and the mirror with hooks as shown in the picture above were all found at different thrift shops.

 

I thought a French poodle quilt would add some whimsy and warmth to our guest room. So that’s going to be our block that I invite you to make for me.

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Isn’t she adorable? Although, I think I’ll make it again and use the dots for the body and the swirls for the furry accents.

 

Pattern: You can find the tutorial and pattern for this adorable poodle here on The Objects of Design blog. You’ll be making the right facing poodle. I am also in Stash Bee Hive 9 and they will be making left facing poodles for me later in the year. 

Fabric selection: You will only be using 4 different fabrics (one for the background, one for the poodle body, one for the furry accent parts, and a solid black for the eye and nose). 

Background possibilities (referred to as White in the pattern tutorial): Please choose one fabric (not scrappy).

  • white on white
  • white with black
  • white with dark gray
  • black on black
  • black with white

Poodle Body (referred to as Light fabric in the pattern tutorial): Your poodle should be the opposite color of your background. Here again, choose one fabric–not scrappy. Example: If you select a black background, then choose a white fabric for the body.

Body possibilities:

  • white on white
  • white with black
  • white with dark gray
  • black on black
  • black with white
  • white or black with pink or wine or burgundy but no other color except gold or silver (I don’t have any samples but thought I’d throw it out there just in case someone has something like that as I think it would make a great poodle body or furry accent.

 

amb_47 Light wineAmerican Made Brand Fabrics has a wine color (AMB 47 Light wine) that looks like it matches nicely (but then I am just looking at it online and not in person). I included it here to give you a color sample.

Furry Accent (referred to as Dark fabric in the pattern tutorial): Please select a complimentary fabric to your body selection. If using a white fabric, find one that is also white but has lots of contrast that will make it stand out or read as a darker version of your color choice.

Nose tip and eye: Solid black

My quilt will not be all black and white. The cornerstones will be pinks and wines and burgundy. There might be a pink or burgundy flange binding too.

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Here’s some pinks and wines with one burgundy/gold that I have that I thought would make nice cornerstones. What do you think?

 

I am using the picture on the wall in that guest room for inspiration.

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If you have a 4.5″ square of pink, pink/white,  white/pink, wine, or burgundy fabric that you’d like to include in the cornerstones, I would really appreciate it.  I would also love to receive a 1.5″ square of each of the fabrics (except the solid black) that you use in this block so I could include it in my postage stamp quilt.

Hints: I dabble in small pieces and there are a fair amount of small pieces in this pattern. To make things a bit easier for you, I made up some labels in the pdf below. Just print, cut them out, and lay them on the anatomical parts so you don’t get confused. Believe me, without labels, when you come back to your sewing machine after your lunch break, you won’t know the ear from the rear.

My next hint is to use a scant 1/4″ seam. Measure and trim as needed. The block will be 14″ unfinished.

Hint number three pertains to pressing seams. The block will be sashed so I won’t have to worry about nesting seams. However, I prefer the seams in the block to be pressed to the side, usually to the dark side (I just finished watching episode 1 of Star Wars so I couldn’t resist putting that in). But there will be times that doing so will make for a very bulky seam so you will need to watch for that and press in the direction that makes the most sense so as to avoid that bulk.

Lastly, read the tutorial through before starting. Note the corrections as I have listed them below. There are a lot of steps. But the poodle comes to life quite quickly once all the pieces are cut and prepped. I’ve prepared a cutting check-off list for you as I found that to be helpful for me and have included it in the pdf below.

Pattern corrections (these will make more sense if you locate the section in the tutorial and note it): 

Cutting Dark fabric: Cut one 2.75 by 4.25 rectangle rather than the 2.75 by 4.75

The caption of the picture that shows the squares for flipping the corners for the dark (furry accent parts) should read: For ear: (last line of caption should say) “on upper (not lower) left corner.”

When making the Under belly, the square should be a 2.75″ light (body) not 2 inch as listed.

When sewing the Lower left middle: sew 1.25 by 2 inch light (body) strip to shortest side.

Extras: One 1.25 by 2.75 in background rectangle with light 1.25 flip in lower left.

Here’s the pdf label and cutting chart for your convenience.

Right facing poodle cutting checklist and labels

Do check back again as we explore Paris together. I will show you pics of things I saw, tell you funny stories of things that happened to me (“Oh, why do things happen to me?”  Tu-Na laments as she touches the back of her hand to her forehead.), present more poodles as I sew them, and entertain you while you sew for me.

*yes, yes, please. My dear quilty friends, a trip to beautiful Paris would be so marvelous. (ok. This was from Google translate. My French vocabulary consists of oui oui and merci).

What I Learned Today:

  1. What a muzzle is. I am not a dog person and had no idea so I had to look it up.
  2. If it can go wrong, it will.
  3. I miss being in Paris.
  4. How to change my address in our address spreadsheet.
  5. There is hope for me yet (regarding computer understanding).

Question: Have you been to Paris or anywhere in France?

Merci beaucoup. Au Revoir

Karen